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I Am Here and Now

All you can feel | Sarah Schoenfeld | Via

Since the 1950s, we in the western world have increasingly come to understand our most intimate desires and experiences, as the products of a so-called “chemical self”. We are able to explain moods, angers, and diseases both physiological and psychological through an imbalance of substances in the body. All of this, of course, takes place against the backdrop of a constantly shifting legal and political climate regarding the regulation of different types of mood altering substances.

What all these substances actually look like when their essence is visually depicted? Sarah Schönfeld squeezed drops of various legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures onto negative film which had already been exposed. Each drop altered the coating of the film. Much like the effect of some of these substances on humans, this can be a lengthy process – sometimes one that can barely be stopped.

She then enlarged these negatives including the chemical reaction of the particular drug, to sizes of up to 160 x 200 cm. All of the substances behaved very differently: the shapes and colors that appeared showed unique characteristics and revealed unique internal universes. Schönfeld explores the possibilities of photography at the frontiers of what can be visually portrayed– the interface between representation and reality.

Reblogged from cjwho  5,180 notes

Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge | Mike O’Callaghan

The Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge is an arch bridge in the United States that spans the Colorado River between the states of Arizona and Nevada. The bridge is located within the Lake Mead National Recreation Area approximately 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, and carries U.S. Route 93 over the Colorado River. Opened in 2010, it was the key component of the Hoover Dam Bypass project, which rerouted US 93 from its previous routing along the top of Hoover Dam and removed several hairpin turns and blind curves from the route. It is jointly named for Mike O’Callaghan, Governor of Nevada from 1971–1979, and Pat Tillman, a football player who left his football career with the Arizona Cardinals to enlist in the United States Army and was later killed in Afghanistan.

Photography: James Stillings

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Reblogged from escapekit  1,567 notes

Tornadoes of Light

Martin Kimbell is a photographer from England who utilizes LEDs and long exposure techniques to create airborne light forms that seem like trails of otherworldy spacecraft. 

Reblogged from ryanpanos  1,323 notes

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways

In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more